Rechtsextremistische Fahnen auf einer Demonstration zur Illustration des Arbeitsfeldes „Rechtsextremismus“

Right-wing Extremist Scene of a Subculture Character

The subculture-oriented right-wing extremists with their membership of 8,200, though seemingly heterogeneous and unstructured, currently make up the largest group among German right-wing extremists. An accurate line cannot always be drawn between the various tendencies. The bulk of this scene is meanwhile constituted, apart from right-wing extremist youth cliques, right-wing extremist hooligans or other right-wing extremist violent individuals, by adherents of the affiliated music scene in particular.

Besucher einer MusikveranstaltungZoomParticipants in a music event

The skinhead subculture which had dominated the scene in the past has continuously been losing in importance, now just playing a minor role. What is left is the preference for activities of an event-like character, especially the attendance of scene-related music events. The music typical of the scene with its various facets, the typical look often characterised by tattoos and scene clothing, and the lifestyle involved are parts of group identity.

Though the majority of subculture-oriented right-wing extremists lack the will to engage in politics on a permanent basis and in a systematic way, neo-Nazis and right-wing extremist parties have been trying to attract this group of people, by organising performances of right-wing extremist bands at (party) events, for example, and to mobilise them for their own political activities such as demonstrations.

The lack of interest in engaging in systematic political activities and in becoming part of firm organisational structures as well as the lack of a general ideological concept are typical features of subculture-oriented right-wing extremists. The few structures within this scene usually have restricted regional bonds and are rather loose networks of local, often young, individuals.

The only skinhead organisation which is still active on a national level is the German section of the international "Hammerskins".

Logo der „Hammerskins"ZoomEmblem of "Hammerskins"

The "Hammerskins" are a white supremacist group founded in Dallas, US in the late eighties; activities in Germany have been noted since the early nineties. In 1992, the first regional group of the "Hammerskins" was founded in Berlin. Correspondent to the name, the official logo of the "Hammerskins" is a picture of two crossed claw hammers in front of a cogwheel, sometimes accompanied by the respective national flag. According to their own statements, this is to express "strength, pride and solidarity". In tune with the Hammerskins' philosophy, all members are equal. This is why there are neither chapters authorised to issue directives nor formal leaders within the group. In Germany, the "Hammerskins" – having a racist and neo-National Socialist world view – have come to the public's notice only sometimes through right-wing extremist concerts.

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Anti-terrorist Hotline: +49(0)221/ 792-6000

Anti-terrorist Hotline: +49(0)221/ 792-6000

Publications

Antisemitism in right-wing extremism

Antisemitism in right-wing extremism

DOI: July 2020
Further information Download PDF File
2019 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

2019 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

DOI: July 2020
Further information Download PDF File
2018 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

2018 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

DOI: June 2019
Further information Download PDF File
Cyber attacks controlled by intelligence services

Cyber attacks controlled by intelligence services

DOI: May 2018
Further information Download PDF File
Antisemitism in Islamist extremism

Antisemitism in Islamist extremism

DOI: March 2019
Further information Download PDF File