Rechtsextremistische Fahnen auf einer Demonstration zur Illustration des Arbeitsfeldes „Rechtsextremismus“

Right-wing extremist activities on the Internet

Right-wing extremists and/or right-wing extremist organisations use the Internet to spread their opinions, concepts of the enemy and all forms of propaganda. Nowhere else can such a large number of openly xenophobic, anti Semitic and Islamophobic hate rhetoric be found.

Screenshot der Internetseite www.altermedia-deutschland.infoZoomScreenshot of the website www.altermedia-deutschland.info

The Internet platform Altermedia Deutschland (Altermedia Germany) played a key role in spreading right wing extremist propaganda. The Federal Minister of the Interior banned this platform on 27 January 2016 because it was in particular used to spread racist, xenophobic, anti-Semitic and Islamophobic contents. The Bundesanwaltschaft (Office of the Federal Public Prosecutor) initiated proceedings against five individuals suspected of forming a criminal organisation.

On the one hand, the Internet gives right-wing extremists considerable opportunities to attract public attention for propaganda and recruitment purposes. On the other hand, they consider that there is a relatively high risk of those responsible being identified and of possible prosecution due to measures taken by service providers and/or security agencies. This is why they have increasingly been using areas of the Internet to which access is limited or which are encrypted, for example forums of the right wing extremist scene or instant messenger groups like WhatsApp groups, to coordinate action plans or even to conspire to commit criminal offences.

Last year right-wing extremists used the Internet mainly to mobilise people for anti asylum events, to disseminate their propaganda and/or to conspire to commit criminal offences against accommodations for asylum seekers.

On 20 August 2015, for instance, about 15 individuals, among them also known right wing extremists, conspired to set fire to an accommodation for asylum seekers in Berlin Marzahn, but they failed. The call to meet in a specific place before committing the offence had been spread via a small hooligan supporter forum, which consists of only about 25 to 30 individuals, by means of Facebook and WhatsApp messages.

Social networks play an important role in agitation and radicalisation processes. Uninhibited hate rhetoric on the Internet can lead to individual or collective radicalisation. Groups that are purely virtual at the beginning consolidate and become radicalised on the Internet, and then carry out actions in the real world. By taking executive measures against members of the OSS (Oldschool Society) in 2015, the security authorities managed to dismantle a group that was suspected of pursuing right-wing terrorist goals. However, given the heated atmosphere and the anti refugee mood, there is a continued risk that similar groups may form or that radicalised individuals may commit serious acts of violence.

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Anti-terrorist Hotline: +49(0)221/ 792-6000

Anti-terrorist Hotline: +49(0)221/ 792-6000

Publications

Antisemitism in right-wing extremism

Antisemitism in right-wing extremism

DOI: July 2020
Further information Download PDF File
2019 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

2019 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

DOI: July 2020
Further information Download PDF File
2018 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

2018 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

DOI: June 2019
Further information Download PDF File
Cyber attacks controlled by intelligence services

Cyber attacks controlled by intelligence services

DOI: May 2018
Further information Download PDF File
Antisemitism in Islamist extremism

Antisemitism in Islamist extremism

DOI: March 2019
Further information Download PDF File