Rechtsextremistische Fahnen auf einer Demonstration zur Illustration des Arbeitsfeldes „Rechtsextremismus“

The neo-Nazi scene

Demonstration in MagdeburgZoomDemonstration in Magdeburg

Neo-National Socialists – neo-Nazis for short – adhere to an ideological form of right-wing extremism which follows historical National Socialism. Historical National Socialism is the basis and a fundamental point of reference for the neo-Nazi world view, which is characterised by the ideological elements of racism, anti-Semitism, nationalism and anti-pluralism. Neo-Nazis strive for an authoritarian state according to the Führerprinzip ("the leader principle"). In an attempt at revisionism, they reinterpret historical facts, which can go as far as Holocaust denial. An ethnically homogeneous Volksgemeinschaft ("the people's community"), which neo-Nazis strive for, is of great importance. In this type of community, individuals have to submit to the welfare and wishes of the community. People who do not belong to the Volksgemeinschaft are regarded as inferior. In the neo-Nazis' view, ethnic diversity and a pluralist society threaten the existence of their own people. Therefore, the so-called Volkstod ("the people's death") ideology plays a key role.

The neo-Nazi spectrum ranges from subculture-oriented groups through an increasing number of groups which are open to ideological variants of National Socialism and to adopting new types of behaviour to groups which continue to strive for a complete restoration of historical National Socialism.

Kennzeichen der „Weisse Wölfe Terrorcrew“ (WWT)ZoomSign of Weisse Wölfe Terrorcrew (WWT)

An example of this is the neo-Nazi organisation WWT (White Wolves Terror Crew), which was banned by the Federal Minister of the Interior as of 16 March 2016. Members of this association had publicly endorsed parts of the National Socialist world view, calling for the violent overthrow of the existing political system and the creation of a political system based on National Socialism. Moreover, WWT members had committed right-wing extremist offences for years, including acts of violence against people with a migration background, political opponents and law enforcement officers.

Over the last few years, the political parties DIE RECHTE (The Right) and Der III. Weg (The IIIrd Way) have established themselves as rallying points for neo-Nazis. Senior members of these parties come from the neo-Nazi scene and have by no means abandoned its ideology. Protected by party privilege, they continue to spread a deeply racist world view. It remains to be seen to what extent this trend will continue.

Neo-Nazis attract public attention mainly by means of demonstrations and propaganda actions. Their wish to be politically active and spread their ideology in connection with a high level of organisation distinguish them from followers of subculture-oriented right-wing extremism. At the moment the neo-Nazi scene's main concern is anti-asylum agitation. After a continuously weak mobilisation since 2012, this type of agitation has again led to a nationwide rise in right-wing extremist demonstrations.

Here you find information on right-wing extremist demonstrations.

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Anti-terrorist Hotline: +49(0)221/ 792-6000

Anti-terrorist Hotline: +49(0)221/ 792-6000

Publications

Antisemitism in right-wing extremism

Antisemitism in right-wing extremism

DOI: July 2020
Further information Download PDF File
2019 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

2019 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

DOI: July 2020
Further information Download PDF File
2018 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

2018 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

DOI: June 2019
Further information Download PDF File
Cyber attacks controlled by intelligence services

Cyber attacks controlled by intelligence services

DOI: May 2018
Further information Download PDF File
Antisemitism in Islamist extremism

Antisemitism in Islamist extremism

DOI: March 2019
Further information Download PDF File