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Left-wing extremist efforts

"Deutsche Kommunistische Partei" (DKP)

Logo „Deutsche Kommunistische Partei“ (DKP)Logo of the ‘Deutsche Kommunistische Partei’ (DKP)

The "Deutsche Kommunistische Partei" (DKP – German Communist Party) was founded in 1968. It is considered the follow-up party of the "Kommunistische Partei Deutschlands" (KPD – Communist Party of Germany) which was banned by the Federal Constitutional Court in 1956. The DKP professes its commitment to Marx', Lenin's and Engels' doctrines which are considered the guidelines of its political activities. The DKP endeavours to overthrow the existing political and economic conditions to establish a socialist society and eventually communism. This aim is i.a. laid down in its party programme.

In the years after its – as the party calls it – "reconstitution" – the number of DKP members has grown from initially 9,000 to over 40,000.

Until the end of the German Democratic Republic (1989), the DKP had maintained a close relationship with the former "Sozialistische Einheitspartei Deutschlands" (SED – Socialist Unity Party of Germany). In the framework of its "Westarbeit" (Work on the West), which served to exercise communist influence over the Federal Republic of Germany, the SED provided the DKP with significant political and financial support. After "real socialism" had failed and the German Democratic Republic ended, the DKP underwent a serious crisis regarding its identity and existence. The number of members began to fall, and it is still doing so. At present, the DKP has around 3,000 members. The party's financial situation is probably still very strained.

Since 2009, the DKP has been conducting an open factional dispute even in newspapers and on the Internet, which is very unusual for a communist party. This dispute is about the question how the party's political aim – establishing a socialist society and eventually communism – can be achieved.

The dispute considerably affected the 20th party convention held in Mörfelden-Walldorf (Hesse) on 2/3 March 2013, where the party's executive committee was elected. For the first time since the party's founding, two members of the current executive committee competed for the position of party leader in an open fight – which is unusual for a communist party, too. After a non-public leadership debate lasting for hours, the delegates to the party convention elected Patrik Köbele their new party leader. He had previously been the spokesman of the opposition within the party, and belonged to the minority within the party's old executive committee.

In the "Political Theses" developed by the majority of the party's old executive committee the latter demanded that the party open itself to social movements, as the party was barely able to act due to the falling number and aging of its members. The opposition within the party considers the "Political Theses" a renunciation of the genuine doctrine of Marxism-Leninism, and they demand a return to past values. The opposition is of the opinion that by implementing the "Theses", the importance of the working class as the revolutionary subject and the avant-garde position of the party will be abandoned, which they consider revisionist and destructive to the party's mobilisation capacity.

The delegates to the 21st party convention to be held in Frankfurt/Main on 14/15 November 2015, expect the party to make a fundamental decision on its future ideological and strategic orientation, which is to end the factional dispute that has been going on for several years.

"Marxistisch-Leninistische Partei Deutschlands" (MLPD)

Logo „Marxistisch-Leninistische Partei Deutschlands“ (MLPD)Logo of the ‘Marxistisch-Leninistische Partei Deutschlands’ (MLPD)

Since the "Marxistisch-Leninistische Partei Deutschlands" (MLPD – Marxist-Leninist Party of Germany) emerged from the "Kommunistischer Arbeiterbund Deutschlands" (KABD – Communist Labourers' Union of Germany) in 1982, Stefan Engel has been its leader. The MLPD continues to stick to its strict Maoist-Stalinist orientation, professes its commitment to Marx', Engels', Stalin's and Mao Tse-tung's doctrines, and follows the organisational and leadership principle of democratic centralism. This means that all party members will have to unconditionally subordinate themselves to the central committee. According to its own statements, the MLPD combines "the struggle for the demands of the labourers' and people's movements with the aim of the international socialist revolution". With its c. 1,800 members, the MLPD probably is the strongest party in the Marxist-Leninist spectrum with regard to financial resources. The party's aim is to overthrow the "dictatorship of the monopoly capital" by means of a revolution, and to establish the "dictatorship of the proletariat", i.e. a socialist society. The MLPD continues to stick to its avant-gardist demand of being the leader of the working class, which it intends to establish the dictatorship of the proletariat with.

"Trotskyists"

Logo „marx21“Logo of ‘marx21’

C. 1,400 individuals are classed as belonging to the Trotskyist spectrum in Germany.

Trotskyists pursue the strategy of entryism, i.e. the targeted infiltration of other, mostly competing parties or associations with the aim of instrumentalising these organisations for their own ideological and tactical purposes by exercising covert or overt influence.

"Marx21", which has been the most active network for years, and the "Sozialistische Alternative" (SAV – Socialist Alternative), are of major importance.

The network "Marx21" is the German section of the London-based international Trotskyist umbrella organisation "International Socialist Tendency" (IST). With its c. 300 members, "marx21" is one of the openly extremist networks within the party DIE LINKE, although the party's executive committee has not acknowledged it as a German-wide network. Through participating in the German-wide movement "Sozialistische Linke" (SL – Socialist left), "marx21" tries to influence the party DIE LINKE.

Logo „Sozialistische Alternative“ (SAV)Logo of ‘Sozialistische Alternative’ (SAV)

With its c. 300 members, SAV is the German section of the London-based international Trotskyist umbrella organisation "Committee for a Workers' International" (CWI). SAV defines itself as a "revolutionary, socialist organisation in the tradition of Marx, Engels, Lenin, Trotsky, Luxemburg, and Liebknecht". Through participating in the German-wide movement "Antikapitalistische Linke" (AKL – Anti-capitalist left), SAV tries to influence the party DIE LINKE.

"Rote Hilfe e. V." (RH – Red Aid, regd. assoc.)

Logo „Rote Hilfe e. V.“ (RH)Logo of ‘Rote Hilfe e. V.’ (RH)

The members of the "Rote Hilfe e. V." are left-wing extremists of various ideological/political orientations. As outlined in its statutes, RH defines itself as a "non-partisan, left-wing organisation spanning a variety of movements that provides protection and solidarity". It currently has c. 7,000 members.

Its activities are focused almost exclusively on the left-wing extremist field of work "anti-repression". RH's priority area of activity is providing support to criminals and violent offenders from the "left-wing spectrum" who "have been the victims of state repression because of their political commitment". On request, RH i.a. contributes towards legal fees and expenses as well as towards fines to be paid for by such criminals. In addition, RH also gives left-wing extremist offenders practical advice on how to evade criminal prosecution. Moreover, the organisation participates in various demonstrations and organises information events on subjects such as "legal assistance" and "state repression".

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Anti-terrorist Hotline: +49(0)221/ 792-3366

Anti-terrorist Hotline: +49(0)221/ 792-3366

Publications

2017 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

2017 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

DOI: July 2018
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How can I identify extremists and members of foreign secret services within my environment? - Important information for refugees in Germany

How can I identify extremists and members of foreign secret services within my environment? - Important information for refugees in Germany

DOI: March 2018
Further information Download
2016 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

2016 Annual Report on the Protection of the Constitution (Facts and Trends)

DOI: July 2017
Further information Download
Our topics – Facts to know

Our topics – Facts to know

DOI: January 2017
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Industry 4.0 – Challenges of a new technology

Industry 4.0 – Challenges of a new technology

DOI: January 2017
Further information Download
Social media – Risks posed by social networks

Social media – Risks posed by social networks

DOI: March 2016
Further information Download